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FAQnewred.gif (906 bytes)          

Theory of Flight - Level 3


Why learn about Theory of Flight?

 

757.gif (17817 bytes)The pilot today has a large variety of airplanes from which to choose. Of these airplanes many may fly at less than 100 knots top speed while others are capable of speeds well into the hundreds of knots. Some are single seaters carrying only the pilot, while others, even in the single engine light airplane class may carry 10 or more passengers. Some airplanes have laminar flow airfoil sections; others have airfoils of conventional design. A few light airplanes fly at 3 1/2 times their stalling speed; others do well to cruise at 1 1/3 times their stalling speed. Every one of these airplanes has different flight characteristics. If a pilot has a good grasp of the fundamentals of flight, he will understand what to expect of each different airplane that he may have the opportunity to fly. He will understand how best to handle each airplane as a result of his knowledge of the theory of flight and of the airplane’s design. He will comprehend the various loads to which an airplane of a particular design may be exposed while flying under abnormal or adverse conditions of flight. Not only to get the best performance but also to ensure the safety of each flight, an understanding of Theory of Flight is very essential.

The study of theory of flight and aerodynamics can be a lifetime proposition. New theories are forever being put forward. Some questions have answers that are difficult to find.  Others perhaps do not yet have adequate answers.  The information that comprises this section can only be considered an introduction to a substantial, but fascinating, topic in aviation.


Sections in this Chapter:

Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Forces Acting on an Airplane in Flight
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) How Airplanes Fly: Physical Description of Lift
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Wing Design
blueball.gif (326 bytes) CONVENTIONAL AIRFOILS and LAMINAR FLOW AIRFOILS
blueball.gif (326 bytes) PLANFORM DESIGN and OTHER ISSUES
blueball.gif (326 bytes) OTHER WING ADDITIONS
blueball.gif (326 bytes) WING BOUNDARY LAYER
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Fluid Dynamics
blueball.gif (326 bytes) FLOW EQUATIONS
blueball.gif (326 bytes) INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW AROUND A CYLINDER and A WING SECTION
blueball.gif (326 bytes) FOILSIM - BASIC AERODYNAMICS SOFTWARE
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Axes of an Airplane
blueball.gif (326 bytes) THE AXES OF AN AIRPLANE
blueball.gif (326 bytes) BALANCED CONTROLS
blueball.gif (326 bytes) STABILITY OF AN AIRPLANE
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Propeller Aircraft Performance newred.gif (906 bytes)
blueball.gif (326 bytes) WHAT IS AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE?
blueball.gif (326 bytes) THE BOOTSTRAP APPROACH: BACKGROUND
blueball.gif (326 bytes) THE BOOTSTRAP APPROACH: FORMULAS AND GRAPHS
blueball.gif (326 bytes) CONCLUSION & REFERENCES
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Flight Performance
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Flight Instruments
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Navigation Systems
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Basic Instrument Flying
Blue_Arrow82A0.gif (140 bytes) Flight Environment-weather   newred.gif (906 bytes)

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Updated: May 04, 2008